KOODAKPRESS

Vision impairment

According to koodakpress، Vision impairment means lots of different things. It can range from no vision – blindness – or very low vision to not being able to see particular colours. Vision impairment can happen at any age. Most vision conditions in children will stay the same through their life. Some conditions might result in vision problems […]

According to koodakpress، Vision impairment means lots of different things. It can range from no vision – blindness – or very low vision to not being able to see particular colours.

Vision impairment can happen at any age. Most vision conditions in children will stay the same through their life. Some conditions might result in vision problems for only a short time, but others might get worse over time, resulting in much poorer vision or blindness as the child gets older.

What is low vision?
Low vision is when your child can’t see all the things he should be able to see for his age. Your child might have low-to-no vision, blurred vision or loss of side vision. Or his eyes might not be able to see some colours – this is called colour blindness.

What is blindness?
A child is considered legally blind when she can’t see at 6 m what a child with normal vision can see at 60 m, or if her field of vision is less than 20° in diameter (a person with normal vision can see 180°).

Causes of vision impairment

Vision impairment can be caused by genetic conditions. It can also be caused by damage or injury to the eye, to the pathways connecting the eye to the brain or to the visual centre of the brain.

Babies might have vision impairment at birth. It can also happen later as a result of disease, injury or a medical condition.

The most common causes of vision impairment are:

  • neurological conditions that affect the parts of the brain that control sight (cortical vision impairment)
  • genetic conditions like albinism and retinitis pigmentosa
  • illnesses that happen to some very premature babies or babies that have particular problems during their birth
  • conditions like paediatric glaucomacataracts and cancer – for example, retinoblastoma
  • infections by particular viruses during pregnancy – for example, rubella, cytomegalovirus, sexually transmitted infection, toxoplasmosis and so on.

Early signs and symptoms of vision impairment

Children who have vision loss might have normal-looking eyes. Often, it will be something about a child’s behaviour or the way he uses his eyes that makes you think there might be a problem with the way he sees.

Most babies start to focus on faces and objects by 4-5 weeks of age. By about 6-8 weeks, most babies will start smiling at the familiar faces and things they see. But if a baby has vision impairment, you might notice she has trouble doing this.

Other signs that a baby might have a problem with his vision are if his:

  • eyes move quickly from side to side (nystagmus), jerk or wander randomly
  • eyes don’t follow your face or an object, or he doesn’t seem to make eye contact with family and friends
  • eyes don’t react to bright light being turned on in the room
  • pupils seem white or cloudy rather than black
  • eyes don’t line up but look towards his nose or turn outwards.

An older child might:

  • hold things up close to her face
  • rub her eyes a lot
  • turn or tilt her head or cover one eye when looking at things up close
  • get tired after looking at things up close – for example, reading, drawing or playing handheld games
  • seem to see better during the day than at night
  • say she has tired eyes
  • seem to have misaligned eyes or a squint
  • seem clumsy – for example, she might knock things over or trip often.
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